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Quick effective upper chest workout5806

Dirkenhiemer private msg quote post Address this user
One must not forget wearing a faggot cutoff, and then stare at yourself in the mirror while doing dumbbell curls to look like a sick kunt. This definitely helps your bench! When I wear a cutoff to the gym, my bench shoots up 50 lbs and my arms grow 33 inches.
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Dukenhiemer private msg quote post Address this user
@Swole
There are a few things you can do.
One, strength has a lot to do with your CNS it is completely possible to get stronger while on a cut.
Two, 3x3 has been my bread and butter for increasing my strength. Train in the low rep range.
Three, SPEED BENCH, this is critical in strength gains.
Four, make sure you are training your shoulders heavy as well. On top of that incorporating floor presses, CGBP and the like will help the top half of your lift which is where I usually fail.

Hope this helps!

In the last six months doing this I have gone from benching about 225 for reps to this next week where I'll be doing 260 for 5x3. It takes time so be patient!
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Dukenhiemer private msg quote post Address this user
Oh and I weighed 168.5 this morning.
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jmill private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zyzzst
ek why you always fall for deee troll?

Wasnt trolling at all, I already knew what ek said and agree with this principle that the whole muscle contracts, just trying to further my knowledge and find an explanation to why the upper part of the chest feels more fatigued after inclines.
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Markovich private msg quote post Address this user
I did only incline bench press, and incline bench press with dumbells for about 2 months.
It increased the weight I worked out with in as little as 3 weeks.

I am quite new to training in general. but I did 4 sets of 8 reps with 40 KILOS (80/85 lb?) And I had a stop for safety because I struggled on the 7th and 8th on the last two sets.

Today I train with 55 Kilos, 4 sets of 6 reps.
I think that's insane because I increased so fast. =D
And in those 2 months I got a little better at flat bench and bench press. So I think it goes both ways
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The Dark
Knight
eknight private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zyzzst
ek why you always fall for deee troll?

Wasnt trolling at all, I already knew what ek said and agree with this principle that the whole muscle contracts, just trying to further my knowledge and find an explanation to why the upper part of the chest feels more fatigued after inclines.

Copy and pasted from another thread on the topic:

"There is in fact differentiated neural feedback from motor units depending on the relative length of the component fibers, and this feedback tends to be (or is interpreted by the brain as) more intense when the fibers in question are either shortened (contracted) or lengthened (stretched) in the extreme. However this has to do with proprioception (the ability to sense the orientation and relative position of your body in space by interpreting neural feedback related to muscle fiber length and Joint position) and not tension, fatigue, or level of fiber recruitment."

Basically your body is interpreting what is happening incorrectly, which isn't an uncommon response. When you have a fever, you often feel "chills" even though, logically, you know you're hot, not cold. -3X
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sickrykes private msg quote post Address this user
i just copied this off another forum but this is what im learning about in class.

Its up to genes for the shape of muscles.

Also, the muscle fibers/heads of the chest, are going from the shoulder joint to clavicle and sternum etc, in a someway horizontal line if you know what I mean, so there can't be contracted the one edge of the fibers, for example the fibers near sternum or clavicle ("inner" chest) and the others near shoulder joint ("outer" chest), stay inactive.

With specific exercises and angles, you just emphasize areas (for our example upper chest, not inner or outer), and not isolate them from the whole muscle group.
Also its important to use angles, not only for emphasizing, but to work the body and the strengths of it, in all planes.

Thats what I believe and my opinion.

So for me its a myth for the inner or outer chest thickness (there is no inner/outer heads for chest, just clavicular, sternal etc or if you want, upper, medial, lower), but not exactly myth for emphasizing particular heads of a muscle.

so is this true or not? the course im doing is cert 3 and 4 in fitness, next year im doing diploma of fitness
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The Dark
Knight
eknight private msg quote post Address this user
I've already not only addressed this, but provided the data on it. If a muscle only has one point of insertion, then it can ONLY contract entirely from origin into insertion. Because two nerves innervate the muscle via the clavicular and sternal portions (potions- not heads; heads would imply separate and distinct portions of the muscle, as in biceps, triceps, or quads) somehow people have tried to argue that two nerves=two areas of movement. Untrue. As you can see here: http://anatomy.med.umich.edu/musculoskeletal_system/pectoral_tables.html#nerves the lateral pectoral and medial percoral nerves communicates with eachother, and do not send signals separately. Point blank, you can't get part of the muscle to activate more than another part.

Some of the research:

Barnett, C., et al. (1995) showed that the clavicular head showed no significant difference in EMG activity from the horizontal to the incline position but was least active during the decline bench press. "

Barnett, C., et al (1995), also found this to be true, noting "The incline press does not result in greater activation of the clavicular head of the pectoralis major than the horizontal bench press." (http://www.daveywaveyfitness.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/Effects-of-Variations-of-the-Bench-Press-Exercise-on-the-EMG-Activity-of-Five-Shoulder-Muscles.pdf)

Glass, S. C., & Armstrong, Ty. (1997) EMG results also showed no significant difference for upper pectoral activation between the incline and decline bench press.

"With regard to the angle of bench press, the upper pectoral portion is unchanged."


-3X
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