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Benching with flared elbows3952

Stepheningchen private msg quote post Address this user
Hey everyone!

This is my first time typing a thread. Before I begin the discussion, I just want to let you guys know that I've read many threads on here and have been inspired and motivated by many of you. Thank you!

Now on to the discussion...

I just read an article by Menno Henselmans on SS saying that the chest can be stimulated more when the elbows are flared out when benching.

I understand that flaring your elbows out can cause more stress on the shoulders, compared to keeping them tucked in towards your body, and that when you use this method, you should use a lighter weight and not lower the bar all the way down to your chest.

So here is my question:

Would using a lighter weight and flaring out your elbows be more effective in stimulating muscle growth compared to using heavier weight and keeping your elbows tucked in?

Thanks!

Steve
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Thor private msg quote post Address this user
Imo, you just shouldn't bench with elbows flared. I really doubt that a slight tuck will significantly reduce pec activation. (I'm not aware of any studies on this point.) However, I know for sure that a destroyed shoulder significantly reduces pec activation.

My advice would just be to play it safe, injuries suck big time and while light sets with flared elbows are passable, once you add up all the work your shoulders get over a week it's quite significant. Most lifters eventually get shoulder troubles, so I think a minimal approach is best.
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AKK private msg quote post Address this user
have a rotator cuff injury and im sure you wish you did things differently, trust me had one killlllls your performance when it comes to pressing movements.
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thecodes private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by AKK
have a rotator cuff injury and im sure you wish you did things differently, trust me had one killlllls your performance when it comes to pressing movements.


Same, my shoulder has been fucked for a week and I'm still hoping it will get better without seeing the doctor >_<
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Cannonball private msg quote post Address this user
Elbow angle has little or nothing to do with risking injury, its more about tucking your shoulders in under your body and not violently bouncing the bar, snapping shit up
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The Dark
Knight
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Irrespective of where your elbows are, full ROM is the best way to prevent injury. The shoulder joint was not designed to stop a weighted movement half-way through the deloading phase of the bench press. That's the point where, biomechanically, you have the least leverage and most stress on the joint. -EK
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AKK private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by eknight
Irrespective of where your elbows are, full ROM is the best way to prevent injury. The shoulder joint was not designed to stop a weighted movement half-way through the deloading phase of the bench press. That's the point where, biomechanically, you have the least leverage and most stress on the joint. -EK


then what happens with a floor press then?


Personally I had my rotator cuff incident doing standing dumbbell shoulder presses, I got stuck mid part of the rep and booooooooom
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The Dark
Knight
eknight private msg quote post Address this user
When doing floor or board presses your shoulders don't stop the weight. That's why you use the floor or the boards. The shoulders get to deload completely when your arms touch the floor, without having to stop the weight on their own. -EK
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Dragonian private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by eknight
Irrespective of where your elbows are, full ROM is the best way to prevent injury. The shoulder joint was not designed to stop a weighted movement half-way through the deloading phase of the bench press. That's the point where, biomechanically, you have the least leverage and most stress on the joint. -EK



How does this apply for standing military press and shoulder press, most people stop before touching there shoulders on db press and on military most people stop before the collar bone i usually touch my collar bone/upper chest area but that literally takes no weight of the strain of my shoulder same with bench i always touch my chest but only a feather light touch does that deload the shoulders briefly as i cant see how it does? although i do believe you just interested as i certainly dont think partial reps (not touching chest)are healthy for your shoulders at all
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The Dark
Knight
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As a general rule, the further from your body your humerus is, the greater stress is on the glenohumeral joint. When is the humerus furthest away from the body? When the elbows are at 90 degrees on ANY pressing movement. -EK
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Dragonian private msg quote post Address this user
interesting, thanks for that
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Stepheningchen private msg quote post Address this user
So to clarify, it is safer to keep your elbows tucked in and use full ROM to prevent shoulder injuries.

I wonder why Henselmann advises us to flare our elbows out if it causes more chance of injuries.
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MrMailliw private msg quote post Address this user
@eknight
So what is your opinion on neutral DB press for chest?
Humerus is closest to the body and so is the safest movement type according to that rule.
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The Dark
Knight
eknight private msg quote post Address this user
Sorry if I was unclear- its not that the humerus is further from the body that's unsafe, it's that trying to stop the movement at that point, before the shoulder joint has completely unloaded the weight that puts the shoulder at greatest risk of injury. -EK
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