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Power lifting VS bodybuilding17219

Thatguy81 private msg quote post Address this user
I've seen a lot of people "switching" back and forth between the 2, so what exactly is different between the training? I've seen deadlift competition vids between powerlifters and bodybuilders and there's usually a difference in size/mass. So does it come down to diet? I doubt "bodybuilders" just curl 20lbs for 700 reps to get "tone", I thought the goal was to lift as much as many times as you can? I'm gonna call out @SRorhrbac0808 with this question also, you used to be shredded beef and now you're just a beast moving houses, what changed? Is it just the "perminate" bulk? I'm pretty sure I used to see the vids of you just pressing the limits of what you could lift...

I mean Ronnie Coleman deadlifts 800lbs for reps, isn't that powerlifting??
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TrustMeImLying private msg quote post Address this user
From my understanding the difference is in training styles. Powerlifters do strength style training (1-5 reps of heavy weight) which forces their body to adapt to lifts and recruit more muscle fibres.

Where as bodybuilders typically do hypertrophy based workouts in the 8-12 rep range. Which is aimed towards building muscle mass.
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Zepa private msg quote post Address this user
Real men do powerlifting... But seriously powerlifting is so much fun
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The Dark
Knight
eknight private msg quote post Address this user
Bodybuilding focuses more on training muscles. Powerlifting focuses on training movements. -3X
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Beans private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by eknight
Bodybuilding focuses more on training muscles. Powerlifting focuses on training movements. -3X


This.

There's always cross over. Huge bodybuilders will be stronger than the average gym rat(Coleman), but won't be able to lift as much per lb/body weight as a power lifter. Lifters might be big, but don't always spend time focusing their training around what needs to be bigger or more proportional. There are some who are successful at both.
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SRorhrbac0808 private msg quote post Address this user
@Thatguy81

Basically what changed for me is I lost interest in bodybuilding. Intensely obsessing over what my body looked like and how many macros I'm eating everyday led me down a dark road for a period of time. I tried dieting for a show. Got pretty damn shredded but just couldn't handle it..... Almost quit lifting weights all together but decided to just keep lifting. As my weight went up I got stronger and eventually I found a passion in powerlifting. Met some people and joined the local PL gym and was best decision of my life. In about one year my bench went from 315ish to 380, squat went from 500 to 655, deadlift went from 500x5reps to 600. And numbers are still growing as long as I stay healthy..... As far as "perma bulking" lol. I'm still very new into powerlifting and have a lot of potential. Im my strongest around 215-220 weight. Which is the 220 class. Eventually I'll be doing the 198 class where I'll
Be more competitive but not for a while until I get to where I want.

Idk if that answered your question or I just babbled on lol hope it helps.
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TimmothyGen private msg quote post Address this user
I like bbing
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GrizzlyBerg private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thatguy81
I mean Ronnie Coleman deadlifts 800lbs for reps, isn't that powerlifting??


Andrey Belyaev (198 lbs) deadlifts 871 @ a BW about 100 lbs less than Ronnie....THAT is powerlifting.

Edit: I am not saying Ronnie is not impressive. Had he focused on powerlifting I am sure he would have a few world records. BUT there are numerous powerlifters who weigh less than/the same as him who can lift the same/more than that.

BB is about being as big/symmetric as possible at the lowest bf% you can reach. Diets are unforgiving and much more strict since low BF levels need to reached.

Powerlifting is about maximizing strength @ an optimal/lowest BW (increasing wilks score). BF matters in terms of your weight but you do not have to be super shredded. If you are 20% bf and bench 500 but can bench 500 at 12%, there is no reason to be 20% BF since you have a better Wilks at 12% rather than 20%.
Diet still matters but just not to the extent that bodybuilding does. training revolves around micro/mesocycles, fixing weaknesses, and practicing the bench, squat, and deadlift (in the scope of the rules and equipment of your particular federation).

For example a powerlifter may spend 2-3 months in the off season where their training doesn't look all too different than a bodybuilders. High exercise variation, high volume. As you get closer to a meet the powerlifter will start a shift towards using only movements directly related to the main movement and start to work in higher intensities (% of 1rm) and lower reps. As you get closer and closer, the training revolves around only doing the main movements, maybe a couple of movements to fix weaknesses and mostly at very high intensities with lower volume.

ex: Half year prep to a meet
Offseason 2-3 months High volume/lower intensity Beltless, w/o knee wraps
2 months Medium Volume/Medium-High Intensity Add Belt
2 months Lower Volume/High-Highest Intensity Add Belt and knee wraps
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SRorhrbac0808 private msg quote post Address this user
@GrizzlyBerg strong response
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Thatguy81 private msg quote post Address this user
Okay, I get it. This will help me make improvements myself, seems like I like powerlifting better. Who knows, maybe I'll get strong one day doing it, lol.
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BC_physique private msg quote post Address this user
Rep range and choice of excersizes is the main. Plus diet will always be the key between bulk and being shredded

Twitter @claytonphysique
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earnit private msg quote post Address this user
Apparently powerbuilding is the new craze?
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GreekLegend private msg quote post Address this user
Forget power lifting and achieve aesthetics.
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Thatguy81 private msg quote post Address this user
^^ive noticed a fair amount of powerlifters aren't very cut, I'd assume this is because they're on a cal surplus to keep up their strength, is that right? If you want to achieve "astetics" I'm pretty sure you'll be watching your diet pretty close, I think this is a huge difference between the two. Not to dicredit the other reasons posted, I agree with them, just seems to be largely based on diet I think...
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MMB private msg quote post Address this user
Not all powerlifters are fat or outta shape. go read @GrizzlyBerg post's again
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Thatguy81 private msg quote post Address this user
I said a fair amount for a reason, not all but some of the REAL beasts aren't cut up really at all...
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_RudeCrew private msg quote post Address this user
Who cares. Lift how you want to.
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ezvmoneybeast private msg quote post Address this user
I want to do both. Just not end up in otter mode lol
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_RudeCrew private msg quote post Address this user
@ezvmoneybeast wtf is otter mode? Hahaha
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leanr0x private msg quote post Address this user
i was in a very unhealthy relation to food while i tried to become more aesthetic. found a powerlifting club randomly and i loved it. gained 12kg in 8 months with keeping nearly the same bf and mastered technique and could increase my maxes from 135kg to 180kg squats, 110kg to 140kg bench and 155kg to 200kg deadlift
feeling much more comfortable now
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Hamer93 private msg quote post Address this user
If your training and diet is on point you will build muscle and get stronger following either paths
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