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thephenomenon private msg quote post Address this user
what is the standard rest time between sets for a PPL routine?
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The Dark
Knight
eknight private msg quote post Address this user
4-6 hours.


And happy birthday! -3X
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csizemore21 private msg quote post Address this user
Just go when you feel recovered from the set before
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Beans private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by csizemore21
Just go when you feel recovered from the set before


I disagree with this to some extent, especially for "bodybuilding" routines vs. power lifting. Keeping track of your rest time and consistently taking the same amount of time allows you to make sure your're hitting progressive overload. If you keep lifting more weight, but take more time in between sets, you aren't necessarily challenging yourself more.

@thephenomenon I generally take around 90 seconds.

Happy New Year, and happy birthday x2.
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thephenomenon private msg quote post Address this user
great reply beans +1
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csizemore21 private msg quote post Address this user
@Beans progressive overload can come in many forms, time,volume, and resistance are all forms of progressive overload. Normally the load will dictate how much time you need
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THE GODFATHER wannabemuscular private msg quote post Address this user
Happy Birthday to all you dudes (if it's really your bdays....)
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Rawsteel private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by thephenomenon
what is the standard rest time between sets for a PPL routine?


Well, it kinda depends on your goal, if you're training for hypertrophy and use 6-12 RM weights i would say 1-3 minutes, closer to 1 minute in isolation movements, smaller muscles and machines and closer to 3 minutes in big compound movements like squat and bench.
If you train for strength a longer rest will be needed (3-5 minutes).
Also, what set method you use and how far you take each set plays a huge role, if you for example take each set to the edge and want to be able to keep the reps up with the same weight a longer rest will be neeed then if you did straight sets where the first sets are stopped 2-3 reps from failure.
I run a PPL and alternate heavy/moderate workouts, on the heavy workouts where i do 3x5 in my first exercise (squat, bench, pull-ups) i use 3 minutes, on my lighter workouts i do 3x8 but with only 2 minutes rest.
In pretty much all accessory exercises i use 90s rest between sets.

PS, the guy over at "aworkoutroutine.com" has a pretty good article on this topic here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beans
Quote:
Originally Posted by csizemore21
Just go when you feel recovered from the set before


I disagree with this to some extent, especially for "bodybuilding" routines vs. power lifting. Keeping track of your rest time and consistently taking the same amount of time allows you to make sure your're hitting progressive overload. If you keep lifting more weight, but take more time in between sets, you aren't necessarily challenging yourself more.


So true, tracking the rest between sets is in my opinion just as important as tracking the weights.
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Cannonball private msg quote post Address this user
if you havent set your birthday it is listed as 1st of january lol
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Beans private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by csizemore21
@Beans progressive overload can come in many forms, time,volume, and resistance are all forms of progressive overload. Normally the load will dictate how much time you need


Right, but in the case of running the same program week to week, the only thing changing is weight and maybe a couple of reps. So if you're upping weight or reps but taking 20 seconds more off between each set every week, you don't know if you actually made gains, or were just more rested. If you aren't training for strength, just lifting more weight for 10 reps doesn't mean shit to anybody, so why not just make sure you are actually getting better week to week instead of just trying to hit numbers?
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csizemore21 private msg quote post Address this user
If your getting stronger within a given range your getting bigger
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csizemore21 private msg quote post Address this user
But I guess that's my opinion (: yours is good to sir
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The Dark
Knight
eknight private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by csizemore21
If your getting stronger within a given range your getting bigger


This isn't the case. It is certainly possible to get stronger, remain in an isocaloric state, and not get bigger.

For those interested, some of the research on rest times:

http://journals.lww.com/nsca-jscr/abstract/2003/11000/effect_of_rest_interval_length_on_repeated_1.2.aspx

"Effect of Rest Interval Length on Repeated 1 Repetition Maximum Back Squats."
Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research:
November 2003. MATUSZAK, MICHAEL E.; FRY, ANDREW C.; WEISS, LAWRENCE W.; IRELAND, TRAVIS R.; MCKNIGHT, MARVIN M.

Abstract
To examine the effects of different rest intervals on the repeatability of 1 repetition maximum (1RM) efforts in the free-weight back squat exercise, 17 weight-trained men served as subjects (mean age 22.0 years). One repetition maximum was tested on each of the first 2 days of testing to establish a stable baseline (1RM = 184.9 kg). Each of the next 3 sessions involved performing 2 1RM back squats, with the rest interval between attempted lifts being either 1, 3, or 5 minutes, assigned in a counterbalanced fashion. For the 1-minute rest interval, 13 of 17 subjects successfully completed the second lift; for the 3-minute rest interval, 16 of 17 were successful; and for the 5-minute rest interval, 15 of 17 were successful. Cochran Q analysis determined no significant difference (p > 0.05) in the ability to repeat a successful maximal-effort back squat when different rest intervals were used. These findings are consistent with the literature for the bench-press exercise and indicate that 1-minute rest intervals are sufficient for recovery between attempted lifts during 1RM testing or training for the free-weight back squat when involving lifters of this caliber.


http://journals.lww.com/nsca-jscr/Abstract/2004/11000/The_Effects_of_Varied_Rest_Periods_Between_Sets_to.28.aspx

"THE EFFECTS OF VARIED REST PERIODS BETWEEN SETS TO FAILURE USING THE BENCH PRESS IN RECREATIONALLY TRAINED MEN."
Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research:
November 2004. RICHMOND, SCOTT R.; GODARD, MICHAEL P.

Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of recovery for recreational weight trainers between 2 sets of bench press to volitional exhaustion. Twenty-eight men performed 2 sets of the bench press at 75% of their previously determined 1 repetition maximum (1RM) to volitional exhaustion. Rest periods of 1, 3, or 5 minutes between sets were utilized on the 3 separate testing days. There was a significant decrease in the number of repetitions performed between the second sets at all rest periods. There were no significant differences in work performed (repetitions x weight) during the second set with the 3- and 5-minute rest periods, but the total work with a 1-minute rest period (1,389.1 +/- 529.9) was significantly less than both the 3- (1,494.9 +/- 451.0) and 5-minute (1,711.4 +/- 478.0) rest period. The data indicated that subjects were unable to fully recover between the first and second sets of maximal resistance exercise, regardless of the rest period. However, subjects were able to maintain a performance level of 8-12 repetitions and sustain the total work performed per set with as little as 3 minutes rest between sets.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3899651/

"Effect of Different Rest Intervals on the Exercise Volume Completed During Squat Bouts." J Sports Sci Med. Dec 2005; 4(4): 361–366. Rahman Rahimi

Abstract
The purpose of this research was to compare effect 3 different rest intervals on the squat volume completed during a workout. Twenty college-aged men volunteered to participate in this study (age 20.73 ± 2.60 years; body mass 80.73 ± 10.80 kg). All subjects performed 3 testing sessions, during which 4 sets of the squat was performed with 85% of a 1RM load. During each testing session, the squat was performed with a 1, 2, or 5-minute rest interval between sets. Volume was defined as the total number of repetitions completed over 4 sets for each rest condition. Statistical analysis was conducted separately for the squat. One-way repeated analyses of variance with Bonferroni post hocs demonstrated significant differences between each rest condition for both exercises tested (p < 0.05). The 5-minute rest condition resulted in the highest volume completed, followed in descending order by the 2- and 1-minute rest conditions. The ability to perform a higher volume of training with a given load may stimulate greater strength adaptations.

Key Points

There is no significant difference in the squat volume between the 1- and 2-minute rest conditions.
A 5-minute rest interval between sets allow for the highest volume to be completed when training with 85% of a 1RM load.


http://link.springer.com/article/10.2165/11315230-000000000-00000

"Rest Interval between Sets in Strength Training." Sports Medicine. September 2009, Volume 39, Issue 9, pp 765-777.
Belmiro Freitas de Salles, Roberto Simão PhD, Fabrício Miranda, Jefferson da Silva Novaes, Adriana Lemos, Jeffrey M. Willardson.

Abstract
Strength training has become one of the most popular physical activities for increasing characteristics such as absolute muscular strength, endurance, hypertrophy and muscular power. For efficient, safe and effective training, it is of utmost importance to understand the interaction among training variables, which might include the intensity, number of sets, rest interval between sets, exercise modality and velocity of muscle action. Research has indicated that the rest interval between sets is an important variable that affects both acute responses and chronic adaptations to resistance exercise programmes. The purpose of this review is to analyse and discuss the rest interval between sets for targeting specific training outcomes (e.g. absolute muscular strength, endurance, hypertrophy and muscular power). The Scielo, Science Citation Index, National Library of Medicine, MEDLINE, Scopus, Sport Discus and CINAHL databases were used to locate previous original scientific investigations. The 35 studies reviewed examined both acute responses and chronic adaptations, with rest interval length as the experimental variable. In terms of acute responses, a key finding was that when training with loads between 50% and 90% of one repetition maximum, 3–5 minutes’ rest between sets allowed for greater repetitions over multiple sets. Furthermore, in terms of chronic adaptations, resting 3–5 minutes between sets produced greater increases in absolute strength, due to higher intensities and volumes of training. Similarly, higher levels of muscular power were demonstrated over multiple sets with 3 or 5 minutes versus 1 minute of rest between sets. Conversely, some experiments have demonstrated that when testing maximal strength, 1-minute rest intervals might be sufficient between repeated attempts; however, from a psychological and physiological standpoint, the inclusion of 3- to 5-minute rest intervals might be safer and more reliable. When the training goal is muscular hypertrophy, the combination of moderate-intensity sets with short rest intervals of 30–60 seconds might be most effective due to greater acute levels of growth hormone during such workouts. Finally, the research on rest interval length in relation to chronic muscular endurance adaptations is less clear. Training with short rest intervals (e.g. 20 seconds to 1 minute) resulted in higher repetition velocities during repeated submaximal muscle actions and also greater total torque during a high-intensity cycle test. Both of these findings indirectly demonstrated the benefits of utilizing short rest intervals for gains in muscular endurance. In summary, the rest interval between sets is an important variable that should receive more attention in resistance exercise prescription. When prescribed appropriately with other important prescriptive variables (i.e. volume and intensity), the amount of rest between sets can influence the efficiency, safety and ultimate effectiveness of a strength training programme.

-3X
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csizemore21 private msg quote post Address this user
Ill read all this tonight at work. Thanks for the info though, studies are always interesting
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Jelet private msg quote post Address this user
To many variables op... And Each ppl routine is different..


and also each exercise is different rest times

Also depends on your goals...

I can do 10 reps and make it a power exercise just from a faster tempo.... And take 5 minute rest between sets.. At same time i can do another exercise for 10 reps and have it at a slower tempo with 1 minute rest between sets...
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340738 15 15
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