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Strength on a cut15628

dserious111 private msg quote post Address this user
Hey what's up folks? Beginning a quick cut to trim some fat gain. Clothes beginning to be snug from my bulk. Plan on cutting 4-6 weeks. Then back to lean bulking. I know for long cuts, your strength probably decreases. Just wondering if you folks experience drastic or just minor strength loss during your cuts? I know you're supposed to lift heavy regardless, just an inquiry.
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THE GODFATHER wannabemuscular private msg quote post Address this user
I'm in the same boat man! Pants are starting to get a bit snug in the waist. My workout frequency is less than it was in the summer and early fall, but I'm still eating the same. Have to cut back.

My bench suffers pretty quick when I drop cals. Squat and Deadlift hang on as long as I stay consistent with them.
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dserious111 private msg quote post Address this user
@wannabemuscular how long you planning to cut?
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THE GODFATHER wannabemuscular private msg quote post Address this user
Well, that's the problem. I'm not planning to. I should though ...
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twreck7 private msg quote post Address this user
OP if you cut slowly and calculate your macros really well, you shouldn't notice that big of a difference in strength. just do less overall volume. lets say uve been doing 6 reps on 225 bench. when ur cutting just aim for 3-4 reps so you don't tax your muscles too much. that'll be enough to maintain the strength and muscle. i start to get weaker if my ego kicks in and i go to failure and don't rest as long as i need between sets
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Tamere02 private msg quote post Address this user
@twreck7
Disagree with most of your post.

If the Op reduces the reps he does with the same weight (even more so on bench press) once the cut is over he wont be able to hit those 6 reps which will mean he has gotten weaker.

@dserious111
The work done should be the same for as long as possible and the aim should be to try and get stronger while cutting instead of not getting weaker.

For a 4-6 week cut, assuming its not a quick crash diet, you shouldn't really lose any strength.

I know bench is the most weight sensitive lift and will be the first to go down.

Deadlift should be the last of the big 3 to go down (is for most people weirdly)

And I find the squat depends on your body structure and where you store the fat more than actual weight loss.
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dserious111 private msg quote post Address this user
@Tamere02 yea, that's what I wanted to know for a long cut. Thx for the input. I figured my lifts wouldn't decrease during a short cut. I doubt that I'd ever do a long cut again, but just wanted to know in case I decided to. Thx again
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dserious111 private msg quote post Address this user
@wannabemuscular maybe it's just water weight...I mean, I hope it's just that.
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twreck7 private msg quote post Address this user
@Tamere02 so you're saying you should go to failure with compound movements on a cut? or maybe you're saying you should train on a cut as if you're bulking? lol never heard this before. reducing volume is generally advised when cutting, but hitting the same maxes, for slightly less overall volume
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stopmiring private msg quote post Address this user
@dserious111 I am cutting right now, for 4 weeks. Have not noticed a lot of strenght decreases yet, although I am keeping my deficit too a minimum. Am only dropping about 1 pound a week, but weights are staying the same. If I were to get less strong I will decrease volume, do less sets/exercises and keep the weights the same. I also try to keep my carbs as high as possible. Feels like it really helps me keep energy throughout my workout.
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darklight79 private msg quote post Address this user
Lost 4kg. Still increasing deads, ohp and squats.
Rate of cut. The more conservative the loss, better the strength retention and possibly PRs still attainable.
You're not prepping for a comp or cutting weight for a show so no rush.
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Tamere02 private msg quote post Address this user
@twreck7
Going to failure depends on your programme. e.g. my programme has me at the end of a cycle hit the big 3 for 1-4 reps and theres only 2 outcomes whether cutting or bulking ,I get 4 or I fail a rep.

Reducing volume and reducing intensity isn't the same. If you can hit 4x6 reps on bench and you drop a set your reducing volume while keeping your intensity the same.

Hitting 4x4 reduces both the volume and intensity.

Overall all I wanted to say was going from hitting 200lbs for 6 to hitting it for 4 is a loss of strength so advising the OP to just constantly hit less reps then he does now with the same weight isn't optimal for maintaining strength
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The Dark
Knight
eknight private msg quote post Address this user
Going to failure isn't necessary (or even optimal) whether you're cutting or not. -3X
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Tamere02 private msg quote post Address this user
@eknight
I agree, but what about when doing a set like on candito to get a estimate of your max for next cycle or even when flat out maxing out? Wouldn't failing a rep be necessary?
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The Dark
Knight
eknight private msg quote post Address this user
No. There's a difference between planned failure and "oops, I genuinely thought I had one more rep and thank God I had a spotter" failure. When you're determining a max, you should have a pretty good realistic idea when you're to the point of not being able to do another clean rep or add another 5 pounds. That one extra rep isn't going to magically elicit extra growth, and most times when it's a training max, form goes to shit because we should have stopped 5 pounds ago anyway. -3X
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darklight79 private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by eknight
No. There's a difference between planned failure and "oops, I genuinely thought I had one more rep and thank God I had a spotter" failure. When you're determining a max, you should have a pretty good realistic idea when you're to the point of not being able to do another clean rep or add another 5 pounds. That one extra rep isn't going to magically elicit extra growth, and most times when it's a training max, form goes to shit because we should have stopped 5 pounds ago anyway. -3X


Eloquently and accurately put. And those i see at my gym who depended so much on spotters, when they suddenly find they have to train solo due to some circumstance, they can't even lift shit. Looks like the "it's all you bro!" wasn't all you.
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