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Why do people do incline presses?15314

The Dark
Knight
eknight private msg quote post Address this user
@eventheodds1 and he's not going to.

@Rawsteel you cannot selectively work the clavicular head of pec major more by doing inclines. Some EMG studies have shown that increasing the angle of inclination does work the chest as a whole more.

@oceanair your chest development seems fine to me. -3X
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oceanair private msg quote post Address this user
@eknight lol thanks 😜
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DEXchidera private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by eventheodds1
I miss so many of those members from that post.

Me too. We have lost many good men
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swollenscott private msg quote post Address this user
@rawsteel last time I checked the hodgetwins were doing push/pull/legs/repeat to make them gainzzz haha funny fuckers. Ps love them and Furious Pete for the laughing factor. Eating challenge anyone????

I do flat as my primary chest work and add a few inclines after as accessory work as I'm not a huge fan of overhead pressing given my swimming background. I enjoy inclines regardless of science and that's why I gym for the fun of it
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Rawsteel private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by eknight
Some EMG studies have shown that increasing the angle of inclination does work the chest as a whole more.


Well i'll be damned.
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THE GODFATHER wannabemuscular private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rawsteel
Quote:
Originally Posted by eknight
Some EMG studies have shown that increasing the angle of inclination does work the chest as a whole more.


Well i'll be damned.


Must be why I feel I get a much better pump when I do inclines.! Hence, why I like inclines.
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Rawsteel private msg quote post Address this user
Eknight, do you know of any EMG studies that has compared the recruitment of the anterior delts between flat bench and a 20-30° incline?
If ones pinch the shoulder blades together, retract the shoulders and have a small arch in the lower back, would there be any noticeable difference between the two when it comes to front delt recruitment?
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The Dark
Knight
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I don't know of any regarding arch, but this EMG data indicates that as the angle of inclination increases, anyerior delt recruitment increases, which makes sense since the shoulder moves more into flexion: http://www.daveywaveyfitness.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/Effects-of-Variations-of-the-Bench-Press-Exercise-on-the-EMG-Activity-of-Five-Shoulder-Muscles.pdf -3X
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jonrivs49 private msg quote post Address this user
@Rawsteel. We all know about upper chest doesnt really exist. But why I think people do Incline presses is because it also have a carry over in your flat bench. If your doing a flat for years, doing some variation and strengthening your weaker press will help you increase those flat benches. kinda like OHP. For decline presses is more I think beneficial for someone who priorities building the chest. Because it has less shoulder and tri involvement.
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the1 private msg quote post Address this user
is it just me or Incline press is just another variation to work your pec/chest muscles, why not do them?
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DEXchidera private msg quote post Address this user
@the1 My thoughts exactly. Why all the hate for the incline
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The Dark
Knight
eknight private msg quote post Address this user
@the1 I agree.

@DEXchidera I have no hate for it, but it does grind my gears that people still believe it somehow can preferentially develop part of the chest more than another part. -3X
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DEXchidera private msg quote post Address this user
I understand. I do have a question though, my pecs are pretty flat directly under the clavicles while the rest of the muscle has grown pretty well. I have been considering doing incline work and though I know there is no preferential recruitment, would I still be able to fill out that area more with inclines or am I doomed?
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The Dark
Knight
eknight private msg quote post Address this user
It will fill out with overall growth. IMO, you're better off doing guillotine presses. -3X
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jonrivs49 private msg quote post Address this user
@eknight. Why guillotine press?
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THE GODFATHER wannabemuscular private msg quote post Address this user
@DEXchidera Just go ahead and give them a try for some time. I swear I respond better to inclines in regard to the chest appearance/development. Maybe it's just cause my form is better suited for it, IDK, but I get a much better pump and more overall soreness when I do inclines. I feel the top of the chest get much more of a stretch when I bring the bar all the way down as compared to flat bench. It just "feels" better to me.
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DEXchidera private msg quote post Address this user
@Wannabemuscular I will try them for sure. Then I can decide for myself where I stand in the whole incline/upper chest thing
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The Dark
Knight
eknight private msg quote post Address this user
^^THIS is why there is "hate." There's nothing to decide in terms of upper chest. There's is no upper chest. It's an absolute fact of physiology that has been demonstrated numerous times. -3X
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DEXchidera private msg quote post Address this user
What bout the 'clavicular' head of the pectoralis major... Isn't it technically the upper portion of the pecs. I am really confused here
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The Dark
Knight
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The pec major is one muscle. Just one, not two. It either contracts entirely or not at all. Because both heads share a common point of insertion, changing the angle of inclination doesn't preferentially recruit more of one area than the other. -3X
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DEXchidera private msg quote post Address this user
OK not sure what any of this means but I got it off wikipedia, it seems though that the clavicular portion functions more with the deltoids. Could you kindly shed more light on it

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The Dark
Knight
eknight private msg quote post Address this user
Have a read here. Taken from my previous thread on the topic:

OK, after being asked to discuss this, I started a new thread. Pardon me in advance that this is going to be long, I'm sure.
We've all heard for years, I'm sure, that doing incline bench presses will work more of the upper chest, right? Wrong. Here's why. Quick review of anatomy for those who are interested. The muscles of the chest are composed of two primary muscles- the pec major and minor. The pec minor is NOT a "mover." It is a fixating muscle whose only action is fixate and stabilize the scapula by drawing it inferiorly and anteriorly against the thoracic wall. In other words, it will not gain significant hypertrophy from bench pressing, because that's just not what it does- it fixates and helps keeps the shoulder joint in place; it doesn't move and contract the way that the pec major does. Next, the pec major- the large muscle that fans our from the sternum to the shoulder joint, with fibers running out in that direction. Muscles, as we all know, can only contract in the following ways- one, either completely or not at all (like a light switch), so there's no way to work only a portion of the muscle; in other words, you can't cause a nerve impulse to contract from one portion of the muscle without contracting the entire thing- just doesn't work that way. Two, they only contract in the direction that the fibers run (which is why pullovers are not a "chest" movement- they cause the chest to move up-and-down, not in and out). Finally, Electromyography (EMG) is a technique for evaluating and recording the electrical activity produced by skeletal muscles. It actually measures where and how hard a muscle contracts. Basically, when a muscle contracts it produces electrical energy. The higher the electrical energy the more work the actual muscle is producing. By attaching electrodes to the skin over the bellies of each of these muscles this electrical energy can be measured and read using an electromyograph (EMG).
OK, now that that's out of the way, some logic should dictate my next point- if you can only contract a muscle entiely or not at all, significant changes in how that muscle contracts shouldn't be caused by changing the angle of a pressing movement. This is why inclines do not cause significant growth in the "upper pecs"- first, there are no upper pecs, just pecs; second, moving the angle will not increase greater contraction across this gradient.
When applying EMG activity to the chest, what do the results say? Rather than citing each of the several studies that say this, I'll direct you to the follwoing meta-analysis, which has done just that, and quote some of the particulars. Have a read of the entire thing if it interests you: http://www.thesportjournal.org/article/optimizing-development-pectoralis-major

The first noteworthy piece here, states, "It has been perceived that by performing the bench press at the incline position the clavicular head is targeted while the horizontal position targets the sternocostal head. Barnett, C., et al. (1995) showed that the clavicular head showed no significant difference in EMG activity from the horizontal to the incline position but was least active during the decline bench press. "

Barnett, C., et al (1995), also found this to be true, noting "The incline press does not result in greater activation of the clavicular head of the pectoralis major than the horizontal bench press." (http://www.daveywaveyfitness.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/Effects-of-Variations-of-the-Bench-Press-Exercise-on-the-EMG-Activity-of-Five-Shoulder-Muscles.pdf)

Glass, S. C., & Armstrong, T. also found this to be true, concluding that, "there was no significant difference in activation of the upper pectoral portion during either the incline or decline bench press."

In fact, EVERY EMG test I know of said the same thing- isolation of the upper pecs, or even noticeably greater development of them is not going to happen from doing inclines.

So, what's the take home from this? I don't believe that inclines are "bad," or "useless." They offer variation to your workouts, slam the front delts more, increase triceps and pressing strength in general, and certainly have their place. It's just that they aren't going to hit the clavicular head of the pecs much more than flat benching, and thus, offer no advantage over a supine bench press in terms of that. -3X
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DEXchidera private msg quote post Address this user
That helped unconfuse me...Thank you very much for clearing that up for me. I'll just focus on adding as much mass to my chest as possible and hopefully the clavicular area will thicken as well.
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Corkey private msg quote post Address this user
I dont know if this adds any relevance to the arguement, but has anyone found decline to be similar to dips for chest? ive never found them to be THAT effective in stimulating the muscle but rather stretching the clavicular head a bit further. thoughts?
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